When you buy a new home and moving day is looming, it can be tempting to consider doing the move yourself. After all, by not hiring a moving company, you’re saving money.

It is true, the DIY approach can lower your moving costs, which is money you can put towards needed fixes and upgrades to your new property.

But, you’re also adding a lot of work! You’ll need to think about boxes, packing, truck rental, gas, lifting and lugging, friends who offer to help but bail last minute, and more.

So, if you’re going to move yourself, plan carefully. Ensure you have all the boxes and packing supplies (tape, bubble wrap, etc.) you need. Most importantly, put together a reliable crew who can stick with you the entire day. In addition to family and friends, it might make sense to hire a worker for the day.

If that all seems like too much work and hassle, then using a moving company is a time-saving option. Yes, you’ll pay more. But you’ll get professional movers, with a truck, who can do much of the lifting and lugging for you. That will take a lot of the stress out of moving day.

And, keep in mind, you don’t need to get the moving company to do it all.

You can cut costs by having them handle the heavier items, such as appliances and furniture, while you DIY-move other things, such as easier-tohandle boxes.

Regardless of which option you choose, make your plans well in advance. When it comes to moving day, you’ll be glad you did!

Want more tips on making buying and selling easier? Call me today!

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Chances are, you’ve heard the expression, “Your home is your biggest investment.” For most homeowners, that’s true. So, when you’re shopping for a new home, it’s important to consider the financial ramifications of any purchase. Ideally, you want a home that is likely to increase in value over time.

In other words, you want a home with a strong potential return on investment.

But dollars aren’t the only type of return you should look for in a new home. Real estate is unique in that the “emotional” return is just as important as the financial return — and, in some cases, even more so.

Say, for example, you’re thinking of moving to a neighbourhood that is closer to work. In fact, you’ll cut your commuting time by an hour each day. Financially, that return on investment means little beyond some savings on gas. However, the emotional payoff can be very high, especially when you consider what you can do with that extra hour each day. Imagine what it would mean to spend more time with your kids or workout out at the gym more often.

So, considering the emotional return on investment when you’re moving is essential. It has a huge impact on your lifestyle and your enjoyment of the property.

How do you factor that in when selling your property and searching for your next dream home?

When you see a listed home you like, make a list of all the emotional benefits of living there. That list might include having a park nearby, living closer to friends or family, having a home office that isn’t the kitchen table, having more space to accommodate a growing family, and so forth.

Then, factor that list into your decision of whether or not to buy.

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